Sense of coherence does not moderate the relationship between the perceived impact of stress on health and self-rated health in adults with congenital heart disease.

Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Nov 26. pii: 1474515115620314. [Epub ahead of print]

Sense of coherence does not moderate the relationship between the perceived impact of stress on health and self-rated health in adults with congenital heart disease.

Apers S1Sevenants L1Budts W2Luyckx K3Moons P4.

Comment by Susan Fernandes

Abstract

Apers and colleagues examined the relationship between perceived impact of stress on health, sense of coherence (SOC), and self-rated health in 255 patients (median age 35 years) with congenital heart disease.  SOC is described as “an individual’s generalized world view and is determined by the extent to which one perceives his or her internal and external environments as comprehensible, manageable and meaningful.”  Prior studies suggest that a “strong SOC has a positive influence on an individual’s health.”  In this study, the authors found that 23% of the cohort believed that stress moderately affected their health and 11% perceived that it affected their health a lot.  The more patients believed that stress affected their health, the lower their self-rated health scores were.  SOC did not appear to moderate this association as it has been shown to in other patient groups.  The authors suggest that more research is required, but they believe that providers can play an important role in helping patients deal with stress by encouraging them to see stress as a challenge which could ultimately improve their health rather than a “dangerous enemy”.